The Wise Woman Tradition

 

"We are all healers in the Wise Woman tradition. Self-healing and self-loving, we co-create healing with our allies. Our allies are our problems; they bring us gifts of wholeness. Our allies are wise women; they support us in our transformation. Our allies are green allies, wild plants; they supply us with optimum nourishment." Susan Weed

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Healing WISE

Susun S. Weed has no official diplomas of any kind; she left high school in her junior year to pursue studies in mathematics and artificial intelligence at UCLA and she left college in her junior year to pursue life. Susun began studying herbal medicine in 1965 when she was living in Manhattan while pregnant with her daughter, Justine Adelaide Swede.

She wrote her first book -- Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year (now in its 29th printing)-- in 1985 and published it as the first title of Ash Tree Publishing in 1986. In addition to her writing, Ms Weed trains apprentices and students, coordinates the activities of the Wise Woman Center, and is a High Priestess of Dianic Wicca, a member of the Sisterhood of the Shields, and a Peace Elder.

Her worldwide teaching schedule encompasses herbal medicine, ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, psychology of healing, ecoherbalism, nutrition, and women's health issues and her venues include medical schools, hospital wellness centers, breast cancer centers, midwifery schools, naturopathic colleges, and shamanic training centers, as well as many conferences.

For more information on Susan Weed’s Healing WISE and WISE Woman Traditions through herbalism, please visit www.susanweed.com

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Women who Run with Wolves

Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés is Mestiza Latina [Native American/ Mexica Spanish], presently in her seventies, she is a lifelong activist in service of the voiceless; she is a post-trauma recovery specialist and certified psychoanalyst who has practiced clinically for 48 years with the persons traumatized by war, exile and torture victims; and as a journalist covering stories of human suffering and hope.

She grew up in the now vanished oral tradition of her immigrant, refugee families who could not read nor write, or did so haltingly, and for whom English was their third language overlying their ancient natal languages. Her doctorate, from the Union Institute & University, is in ethno-clinical psychology, the study of social and psychological patterns of cultural and tribal groups, with an emphasis in indigenous history. 

For more information on Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés, oral tradition, Women Who Run with Wolves and the Wild Woman archetype please visit, http://www.clarissapinkolaestes.com

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Suppressed Histories Archive

Max Dashu founded the Suppressed Histories Archives in 1970 to research and document women's history from an international perspective. She built a collection of 15,000 slides and 30,000 digital images, and has created 150 slideshows on female cultural heritages across human history.

Dashu's work bridges the gap between academia and grassroots education. It foregrounds indigenous women passed over by standard histories and highlights female spheres of power retained even in some patriarchal societies. Dashu is internationally known for her expertise on ancient female iconography in world archaeology; female spheres of power and matricultures; patriarchies and allied systems of domination; medicine women, female shamans, witches, and witch hunts. 

For more information on Max Dashu, restoring women to cultural memory, please visit, https://www.suppressedhistories.net/

THE WISE WOMAN TRADITION EMPOWERS WOMEN
by Susun S. Weed

The Wise Woman Tradition is the oldest known healing tradition on our planet. It offers a unique view of health that is woman-centered and deeply empowering to women. This is in stark contrast to orthodox - and most alternative - healing traditions, which are based on male viewpoints which disempower women.

The medicine I learned in school was based on a linear, scientific, male worldview whose truth I did not question. When this medicine failed me, as a woman and a mother, I sought alternatives. Herbs helped me take care of myself and my family, simply and safely, but I questioned the assumptions behind what I was taught. It was clear to me that alternative health care disempowers women as much, or more than, orthodox medicine does. They both actively assume that the norm on which assessment of health is to be based is masculine in gender.

Assuming that a healthy male is the definition of health may not seem like much of a problem, unless you are a woman. This core assumption has hurt, and continues to hurt, women in a multitude of direct and indirect ways, from the deeply personal to the widely political. This assumption leads to attempts to "correct" - with drugs and surgery - physical and emotional states that are normal (and healthy) for women, but not for men.

Consider: Healthy women were given DES (a hormone) simply because they were pregnant - their offspring are cancer-prone.

Millions of menopausal women have been (and are still) treated with hormones in an effort to replace what is "lost." Does this improve their health~ No. Use of hormone replacement increases the risk of stroke, heart disease, and breast cancer.

Menstruating women need some quiet time alone. Instead they are offered pink Prozac to help them overcome their "depression."

Women are advised to have their uterus (and increasingly their ovaries, too) removed since they are "not needed after menopause ... just places that can harbor cancer." It is well known that a woman's sexual response is unlikely to be as strong, and may even be lost, when she loses these vital organs. A century ago, a woman who challenged male authority could be diagnosed as "hysterical" and her uterus ("hyster") removed (often without anesthesia or disinfectants).

There is more to medicine than the male perspective. I speak for the woman-centered tradition. It offers men and women a new way to think about and create health in all stages of their lives. It empowers women to take charge of their health and their lives, to honor and respect themselves, and the earth. I call it the Wise Woman Tradition.

The Wise Woman Tradition empowers women by:

~ Focusing on simple remedies that are easily accessible
~ Sharing information freely
~ Offering compassionate listening
~ Renaming her weaknesses as strengths
~ Reminding her that her body is the body of the earth, is the body of the goddess, is the sacred ground of being.

The Wise Woman Tradition empowers women to:

~ View themselves as healthy, even when they have problems 
~ Create their own healthy norms 
~ Honor their natural cycles and changes (puberty, menses, pregnancy, menopause)
~ Define themselves from a woman-centered viewpoint
~ Connect with other women for personal and planetary healing

Much of modern medicine seems complicated and difficult to understand. Many alternative remedies are also complicated, some are unduly expensive, others require special training and initiations. This disempowers women. The Wise Woman Tradition, by focusing on simple remedies that are easily accessible, and by sharing information freely, allows women to feel competent and powerful in taking care of their own health.

The Wise Woman Tradition heals by nourishing the wholeness of each unique individual. Nourishing has three primary aspects: simple ceremony, nourishing foods, and compassionate listening. When women are heard, when we listen to each other, then we feel validated and empowered. Harking back to the consciousness-raising sessions of the 1970's, and informed by Native American teachings of the talking stick, compassionate listening reshapes women's stories so they can reshape their lives.

One of the great gifts of the Wise Woman Tradition is the renaming of our weaknesses as strengths. When we allow ourselves to be depressed, outraged, yearning, grief-stricken, confused, fearful, bitchy, and more; when we allow all that we are to be part of us, then we can finally find and celebrate our wholeness/health/holiness.

The Wise Woman Tradition empowers women by reminding us that we are sacred, that our bodies are sacred. As women, we are the earth. Each one of us lives in the body of the earth. Each one of us comes from this sacred ground of being. And not only are we empowered to honor ourselves, we are empowered to demand that respect from all others.

When women accept orthodoxy's image of them as constantly in need of help, they accept a powerless position. When women accept the Wise Woman Tradition's assertion that they are already perfect, already vibrantly healthy, even when they have problems, they assume a position of power. When women create their own healthy norms, they create a place of power in which they can stand, no matter how fast and furious the changes.

When women believe that their natural cycles and changes (puberty, menses, pregnancy, menopause) are somehow sick or wrong, they open themselves to medical experiments. When women learn that the Wise Woman Tradition honors these states above all others, they find a source of deep wisdom and great power flowing into their lives.

When women define themselves from a male-centered viewpoint, they always loose. When they define themselves from a woman-centered viewpoint, they always win. The Wise Woman Tradition offers this power to women, from the Ancient Grandmother's heart to yours. 


Ms. Weed is the author of the Wise Woman Herbal Series, with five books in print (Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing YearHealing WiseNew Menopausal Years, the Wise Woman WayBreast Cancer? Breast Health! the Wise Woman Way, and Down There Sexual and Reproductive Health the Wise Woman Way) in English, French, and German, is published in peer-reviewed journals ( Journal of Nurse-Midwifery), Find her books at www.wisewomanbookshop.com or at your favorite bookseller...Susun offers mentorship opportunities at www.wisewomanmentor.com and hosts a weekly radio show at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/susunweed where you can call in and ask her health questions.

She sits on many advisory boards: Oregon Menopause Project, CIIS, Above & Beyond Hope Sanctuary, and Weston A. Price Wise Traditions Foundation. The Routledge Encyclopedia of Women's Studies includes her entries on herbalism, menopause, and nutrition. She's been on numerous radio and TV shows including Fresh Air Radio, National Public Radio, NBC News, Prescription for Health, Ask the Family Doctor, Wisdom Channel, and America's Talking.

Susun S. Weed has instructed students at venues such as: Yale Nurse Midwifery School, State University of New York (Scholar-in-residence), Kripalu Yoga Center, Benedictine Hospital, Vassar Brothers Hospital, Northern Dachas Hospital, Conn. Inst. for Herbal Studies,California School of Herbal Studies, New York Open Center, Rocky Mountain Center for Botanical Studies, Florida School of Midwifery, American College of Nurse Midwives, University of Rhode Island, Uni. of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey, Rowe Conference Center, Interface Institute, Sufi Order Healing School, Heart of the Goddess Center, John Bastyr Naturopathic College, Reeves-Reed Arboretum, Hawkwind Earth Uni, and Self Heal Herbal Center. 

She has also trained health-care professionals abroad at such prestigious schools as: The Kosmos/Amsterdam, Waikato College of Herbal Studies/New Zealand, Weg der Mitte/Berlin, Brustgesundheit Centrum/Germany, Arkuna/Munich, Frankfurter Ring/Germany, Australasian College of Herbal Studies/Australia, and Elfenbank/Holland.

During the past three decade she has been a featured teacher at: Green Nations Herbal Gathering, International Herb Symposium, Women's Herbal Conference, Women's Spirituality Forum, HerbFest, Pacific Northwest Herbal Symposium, Midwifery Today Conference, Alaskan Midwives Conference, and Midwives Association of North America (MANA) conferences, among many more venues....

Susun S Weed has received the Twentieth Century Award for Achievement, is included in Who's Who of Intellectuals, was recognized as an Outstanding Person of the 20th Century, and was nominated as International Woman of the Year. Her books and appearances have helped millions of women attain better health and become more powerful in themselves. 

Ms. Weed has no diplomas of any kind, having left high school in her junior year to pursue mathematics and artificial intelligence at UCLA, and having left there in her junior year to pursue life. She began studying her study of herbal medicine in 1965. Her areas of focus are: folkloric herbalism, eco-herbalism, ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, philosophy and psychology of healing, comparative religion, and women's health/spirituality. She is especially interested in altered states of consciousness as they pertain to learning, healing, birthing, and dying; and the role of plants in these states. 

Susun S Weed is an initiated member of the Wolf Clan and the Sisterhood of the Shields; she is a Peace Elder. Her adopted Native American grandmothers are Twylah Nitsch and Keywaydinoquay. She is the founder of the Wise Woman Center and Ash Tree Publishing and the voice of the Wise Woman Tradition. Learn more at www.susunweed.com or find where she is teaching this year http://www.susunweed.com/EventsCalendar.htminterested in going deeper? consider live-in apprenticeship (only for the most serious students) http://www.susunweed.com/Weed_Wise_Apprentice.htm

In addition to online video courses here at teachable.com, Susun also offers traditional by mail and telephone correspondence courses, talk time, books and audios included http://www.herbshealing.com/Correspondence-Course....